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call

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call v

1 in phr call one out: To wake someone. Cf holler v B3
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2 occas with call~ up: To lure a bird or an animal by imitating its call.
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3 usu with call~ on: To ask for assistance; hence vbl n calling on.
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4 also call off: To announce or prompt (the steps in a square dance). Cf call figures v phr
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5 with call~ out: To invite a woman to dance. Cf call-out n 1
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6 also call in: To begin. Cf take in v phr
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7 with call~ off: To list by name.
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8 with call~ for: To name after.
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9 in phrr call one out (of) one’s name, call one~ out of name, rarely call one~ outside one’s name: To call a person (or thing) by a name other than the true one; spec, to apply abusive nicknames or epithets to, call one names. [OED3 call v. P2.c. 1606→; “Now regional and in African-American usage.”]
1799 Centinel of Freedom (Newark NJ) 14 May [3]/2, Some, he remarks, have denominated it aristocratic, (and it is believed they have not called it out of its name, in giving it that epithet). 1839 (1840) Simms Border Beagles 2.96 MS, Look you, stranger, if it’s the length of my teeth you want to know, call me out of my name. [DARE Ed: The speaker had been addressed as “You terrapin.”] 1868 NY Herald (NY) 25 Mar 7/1, He went out and drank more; this occurred several times; at last he called me out of my name, and when I threatened to leave him he forbade me leaving the room. 1873 Sun. Times (Chicago IL) 16 Mar 7/2, The firm . . is not “D. M. Seviney & Co.,” as the bold printer would have it, but “D. M. Swiney & Bro.” When gentlemen have done as well as these they should not be called out of name. 1896 Eve. Times (Washington DC) 25 May 8/2 [Black], “Mah-ree Ferry-ee,” sang out Clerk Harper. . . “Doan’t call me out my name, man,” said she, savagely, to the clerk. “My Chrisun bo’n name is Mary Lis’beth Ferry, an’ dey ain’t no use er puttin’ so much eein on ter it.” 1899 (1912) Green VA Folk-Speech, Call. . . To call out of name; to call by improper and abusive names. 1913 Philadelphia Inquirer (PA) 5 Nov 10/4, Down in the Fifth ward a Burns man . . was arrested by Policeman Sheeran after he had called the officer out of name. c1925 in 1944 ADD swWV, He called me out o’ my name. 1934 Hurston Jonah’s Gourd Vine 242 AL [Black], Know whut he tole me las’ time Ah got ’im ’bout her? Says, ‘Don’t be callin’ dat girl all out her name, Miss Lucy didn’t call you nothin’.’ 1953 Goodwin It’s Good 142 sIL [Black], Now Ruby, if anybody calls you out of your name this morning, don’t pay any attention to them. Just say to yourself, ‘Sticks and stones may break my bones but words can never harm me.’ 1958 Daily News–Rec. (Harrisonburg VA) 7 June 6/7, [Letter:] A salesman stopped and upon being told “no, your wares do not interest me,” did not not politely exit, but persistently insisted I needed what he was selling. . . He then became angry and called me out of my name, words that are most vulgar. 1974 Baldwin If Beale St. Could Talk 38 NYC [Black], I called her Sis as a way of calling her out of her name and also, maybe, as a way of claiming her. 2004 Reg.–Herald (Beckley WV) 1 July sec A 4/3, [Letter:] Upon a recent visit to a nursing home, a resident told me how another resident called him out of his name, preferring the n-word. 2007 DARE File, The new analyst [on the ESPN program “Mike and Mike in the Morning”] . . , an LA native who played at Columbia University prior to his 10-year NFL career . . , is also African-American. In discussing the “boy” incident, he repeatedly used the expression “outside his name”, which, from context meant “not by his name; by something other than his name.” An example would be “if the official indeed called Rolle outside his name. . .” 2012 Leaf–Chronicle (Clarksville TN) 16 Feb sec A 3/4, I seen Eric poking the young man in his chest calling him out his name calling him a false flagging n-word. 2013 in 2017 DARE File—Internet cTX, While the owner was refunding my money, the thug kept talking and I called him out of name. He continued to exhibit rude behavior. 2017 Ibid CA, You never called me out my name and if I ever needed anything you would always be there, it didn’t matter what time it was.
10 To say, pronounce (a word or name).
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11 also call over: To mention (one’s name). S Midl Cf call one’s name v phr
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12 usu of names: To recall, remember. [From call to mind, call to remembrance; cf OED call v.20.b. 1472 →; also infl by recall] chiefly Sth, S Midl
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