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Quarterly Update 14 is Posted!

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This quarter’s harvest of new and revised material features a large group of terms related to games, especially  the ancient and widespread game called—among many other things—tipcat. You take a small stick with tapered ends called—among many other things—a cat, hit it on one end to make it pop in the air, and then hit it again as far as you can. Sometimes players, passers-by, or window-panes get in the way of the flying cat; this can be tough on them, but it means the various terms are well documented in newspapers
Outside of that group this update also includes two substantial new entries, branchhead and carriage, as well as various other substantially enlarged and improved entries, including by prep 4, which has been antedated by 152 years in the US, and still further in England.
A new feature in this update is that several entries have a “Etymological Supplement” appended to them. Generally DARE etymologies refer to the Oxford English Dictionary, the English Dialect Dictionary, or other standard sources for the earlier history of words with origins in British dialects or foreign languages. Increasingly, however, my own research turns up relevant evidence not found in such sources, but which can only be alluded to briefly in the confines of the DARE etymology; from now on I will add the full evidence as a supplement after the entry, and as time allows I will add such material retroactively to earlier updates. Two striking examples in this update are by prep 4 and nipsy, neither of which are found in OED or EDD at all, but for which I have British evidence; other “Etymological Supplements” are at kispel, tipcat, and tippy-cat.

 

This quarter’s harvest of new and revised material features a large group of terms related to games, especially  the ancient and widespread game called—among many other things—tipcat. You take a small stick with tapered ends called—among many other things—a cat, hit it on one end to make it pop in the air, and then hit it again as far as you can. Sometimes players, passers-by, or window-panes get in the way of the flying cat; this can be tough on them, but it means the various terms are well documented in newspapers!

Outside of that group this update also includes two substantial new entries, branchhead and carriage, as well as various other enlarged and improved entries, including by prep 4, which has been antedated by 152 years in the US, and still further in England.

A new feature in this update is that several entries have an “Etymological Supplement” appended to them. Generally DARE etymologies refer to the Oxford English Dictionary, the English Dialect Dictionary, or other standard sources for the earlier history of words with origins in British dialects or foreign languages. Increasingly, however, my own research turns up relevant evidence not found in such sources, but which can only be alluded to briefly in the confines of the DARE etymology; from now on I will add the full evidence as a supplement after the entry, and as time allows I will add such material retroactively to earlier updates. Two striking examples in this update are by prep 4 and nipsy, neither of which are found in OED or EDD at all, but for which I have British evidence; other “Etymological Supplements” are at kispel, tipcat, and tippy-cat.

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